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North America wins bid for the 2026 World Cup

United States, Canada and Mexico team up to out-bid Morocco for the right to host

June 13, 2018 - 5:00 pm
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The World Cup will be coming back to North America in eight years.

On Wednesday, a trio bid (also dubbed the "United 2026") of the United States, Mexico and Canada out-bid Morocco to earn the rights to host the 2026 World Cup.

According to FIFA's bid evaluation report, United 2026 earned a score of 4 out of 5; Morocco was only able to muster a 2.7 out of 5. Furthermore, the United bid was projected to bring in nearly $14 billion in revenue. That number all but blew away Morocco. The final vote ended 134 to 65 in favor of the United 2026.

This is momentous news for North America, as a game that is already growing should continue to blossom with this announcement.

This will be the first time that the U.S. has hosted the World Cup since 1994, and the country's second overall hosting year.

Come 2026, Mexico will set a new standard in World Cup lore as they will become the first country to host or hold a share of hosting rights; this will be their third (1970, 1986).

Matt Reed of NBC Sports Soccer and Pro Soccer Talk joined Schopp and the Bulldog on Wednesday to further discuss the victorious bid and the 2018 Cup field:

"It's obviously a tremendous honor. This will be the second time that the U.S. has been involved in hosting a World Cup on the men's side of things... it kind of goes beyond American soccer because this a 'North American' thing.  We haven't seen a situation like this before with the World Cup.  This will be the first time that three nations have ever co-hosted a World Cup.  The only time that even two countries have ever previously done this was in 2002 when South Korea and Japan co-hosted.  This is a very cool, unique situation."

Reed went on to say that, though there is still eight years to go and a vote from FIFA upcoming, all three countries may receive auto-bids into the tournament.

You can listen to the entire interview with Reed below:

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